Dark matter is about five times more prevalent throughout the Universe than normal matter, and nobody knows what the first is made of. You should keep that in mind if you had the hunch that scientists know too much about the Universe. Dark matter was discovered alm" />

The Origin of Dark Matter Finally Debunked? What a New Theory Says

Dark matter is about five times more prevalent throughout the Universe than normal matter, and nobody knows what the first is made of. You should keep that in mind if you had the hunch that scientists know too much about the Universe. Dark matter was discovered almost a century ago in 1933 when the astronomer Fritz Zwicky made the first observations of the mysterious structure.

But like always in science, there’s hope that the puzzle will be solved one day. In our case, a new study from the University of Melbourne brings that hope. Published in Physical Review Letters, the study proposes a new theory explaining the origin of the mysterious dark matter.

Could expanding bubbles from the Early Universe be the answer?

While astrophysicists are having a hard time trying to even directly observe dark matter, we know for sure it’s there in nature due to several reasons. One of them is the peculiar motions of stars within galaxies that cannot be explained otherwise. Dark matter is also binding galaxies together in a mysterious way.

Dr. Michael Baker, one of the new study’s authors from the University of Melbourne, declares the following:

Our proposed mechanism suggests that the dark matter abundance may have been determined in a cosmological phase transition,

These phase transitions are expected to have taken place in the early Universe and can be similar to bubbles of gas forming in boiling water. We show that it is natural to expect dark matter particles to find it very difficult enter these bubbles, which gives a new explanation for the amount of dark matter observed in the Universe.

The visible matter that we’re all interacting with daily represents only about 5% of the totality of mass from the Universe. While dark matter is scattered in about 27%, dark energy is even more prevalent: it makes up 68% of our Cosmos, and its main role is to make it expand at an accelerated rhythm. 

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